Kitchen Stewardship | A Baby Steps Approach to Balanced Nutrition

Seeking the Perfect Homemade Whole Wheat: a Pause (and What’s Coming Instead)

March 10th, 2011 · 17 Comments · Uncategorized

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Have you figured out the problem with this series?

Giving up grains for Lent will pretty effectively stall it for a while. Winking smile

I was hoping to post one one recipe on Fat Tuesday, but for 3 days I stared down the Peter Reinhart process, it stared back at me, and I decided I was too tired to try it. It included both machine kneading and a “stretch-and-fold” process that’s been highly recommended by many readers, but that process means I had to address the dough every 10 minutes for 30 or 40 minutes. Since much of my bread baking begins after 10 p.m. when the kids are sleeping and the dishes are done, I just kept running out of energy.

So in some ways, it’s a nice time for a break. I’ll come back after 40 days refreshed and ready to bake and eat lots of bread, and the series can finish with the “bang” it deserves. The momentum of one new recipe a week was getting hard to keep up! Thanks for waiting during the break; the end will be worth it, I assure you!

If you’ve missed any of the 8 recipes so far, you can find the whole list at Seeking the Perfect Homemade Whole Wheat Bread.

What’s Coming in the Meantime?

We’ll be busy while we wait!

  • Eat Well, Spend Less: I’m teaming up with a half dozen other frugal and food bloggers to write a 3-week series addressing the recent grocery price increases. The first 3 weeks of April will give you some ideas on how to find real food in unexpected places, how to use coupons well, how to stockpile a frugal pantry, and meals to prepare to reduce your grocery budget overall.It’s a power-packed team led by Jessica at Life as Mom, and I’m very excited to see what we all come up with! I have a great brainstorm document with lots of ideas from the KS Facebook community when I asked what they would be interested in learning about stocking a frugal, real food pantry.
  • Farmer’s Panel: I still need a creative name for this, but I’ve got about 9-10 farmers from across the U.S., all who farm cattle in various ways, from grassfed to conventional, who are answering 20 questions for us. I can’t wait to learn more about the practice of farming in different styles and how much work and conscious thought all these farmers put into their practice.
  • Pregnancy Talk: I’ll start with a quick 3-part series in one week on what I’m learning during my first real food pregnancy and some goals I have for keeping it natural from here on through toddlerdom.
  • In the GNOWFGLINS eCourse right now: My homemade yogurt lesson, which I was super pumped to teach and turned out really well, is the class for this week, the menu plan for premium members (or a la carte) includes 3 exclusive recipes from The Everything Beans Book plus the best discounts for members only that I’ve offered yet (even better than the first 100 launch!), AND I’m going to participate in the conference call on March 25th, also recorded as a podcast.If you’ve been waffling about joining in, this is the month! It’s also a great time to upgrade your membership to take advantage of these cool opportunities. Sign up and find more info right HERE.
  • Lenten reflections on Christopher West and Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body: Once a week during Lent, I’ll be sharing a summary and my thoughts on what my mothers’ Bible study is learning right now. Seriously fascinating, deep, weighty important stuff!
  • Our grain-free Lent: I’ll share a bit of our journey omitting grains from our diet, along with some resources if you think it’s something someone in your family needs to try. I was listening to a podcast with Dr. Tom O’Bryan, a super gluten expert, and he said, “Anyone who complains about anything should be tested for gluten as a possible trigger.” Phew. If you’re sick, chances are better gluten is the problem over any other food. This guy is good, and I’m excited to share what I’m learning with you.
  • The soaked grains FREE eBook will be out in 4-6 weeks along with the introduction of a monthly KS newsletter, something that won’t fill your inbox but will share great information. We’ve got almost 30 contributors and between 30-50 recipes, depending on how many extras we choose to include. It’s going to be a great resource!

I hope you’re as excited as I am about some of these topics and looking forward to the next few months at KS. If you’re new to the community, welcome aboard for a great ride!

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Kitchen Stewardship is dedicated to balancing God’s gifts of time, health, earth and money.  If you feel called to such a mission, read more at Mission, Method, and Mary and Martha Moments.

Disclosure: I work with gnowfglins eCourses and do receive a portion of payments made beginning with my link there. You’ll love the various levels of membership, one for every budget! See my full disclosure statement here.

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17 Comments so far ↓

  • Jaime @ Like a Bubbling Brook

    I really enjoy Peter Reinhart’s recipes! We’ve tried several and I’ve shared a few adapted versions on my site – our family’s favorite is the Cinnamon Raisin Walnut bread. My freshly ground flour is soaked (by using a soaker and biga) and the taste is smooth. The recipe is here: http://likeabubblingbrook.com/2010/05/100-whole-wheat-cinnamon-raisin-walnut/

    It’s definitely worth trying! Lots of work, yes, but so worth it!

  • Jen @ Happy Little Homemaker

    It’s so funny that you mentioned you are doing that soaked e-book because I forgot about it and was wondering while making baked oatmeal last night (for today) if there was a way to soak it and how. And then I wondered if there was a soaked recipe e-book where I could find similar recipes to my own with soaking instructions to try it :). And here it comes!

    Katie Reply:

    Jen,
    You will love Kelly’s version; it’s what we use: http://kellythekitchenkop.com/2009/03/healthy-breakfast-recipe-from-sue-baked-soaked-oatmeal.html
    :) Katie

  • Barb@A Life in Balance

    I can’t wait for the real foods series. Funny, I just complained at Life as Mom about the lack of connection between real food blogging and saving money. As a mom with 5 kids, yes, I’d love to serve my kids and my husband the best food, but reality is different. With gas prices affecting the cost of everything, it’s going to be tough. When I was at the grocery outlet yesterday, I found myself putting certain items back just because they were a want and not a need.

  • Blessed

    I wish you would blog about the meals you are eating while going grain free–because (I can’t believe it) I decided this year to go low carb and gluten free for Lent, which is almost grain free! I can tell my body needs it, so giving the whole diet thing as a trust and faithfulness issue with God is perfect. But I have only been gluten free for about 3 weeks, and now going even more extreme is even a little harder–oh, and we are mostly vegetarian, which makes things even tougher! I do not have a problem with fats (as in eating them) but I have heard convincing physiological argument that our bodies were not originally created to eat meat, and my FIL has an intestinal issue that flares when he eats fats and meat. . . but yet my body feels good when I eat meat. But yet I am not a fan of meat anyway, and don’t like to cook it. . . ; )

    ANYWAY, I am struggling with knowing what to eat. Seeing examples of what other familes are doing is always helpful–so anytime you decide to add blurbs about what you are eating, you will have at least one fascinated and thankful reader.

    Happy Lent!

    Katie Reply:

    Blessed,
    The toughest days are definitely the meatless AND grain-free ones. I posted some in the fall about our grain-free meals and snacks – see everything here: http://www.kitchenstewardship.com/tag/grain-free-lifestyle/ (scroll down for menu ideas and such).

    I’m sure I’ll post more stuff, but thank you for the encouragement, and I’m glad to know I’ll have an interested reader! :) Katie

  • michelle p. from wa

    Just a quick question…is the really groovy deal with the ” Beans” book only for premium members? Just checking before I purchase a copy!

    Katie Reply:

    Yes, just for premium members of the eCourse who receive the menu plan. Does that make sense? I’m sure you’ll love the book either way! :) Katie

  • Christine

    I haven’t read a lot of your blog yet, so I’m not sure if this recipie would work for you, but this is by far the BEST whole wheat bread recipie ever. I grind my own wheat for it, and my husband won’t eat anything else now. I work full time, and make this bread every week for my family. It’s so easy to make!

    http://everydayfoodstorage.net/2009/03/11/making-homemade-bread-the-food-storage-recipe-challenge/food-storage-recipes

    To keep costs lower, I buy the Gluten at Honeyvillegrain.com. Way cheaper than the natural food stores.

  • Kate @ Modern Alternative Mama

    Gee, you sound as busy as I am! :) Bloggers do wear so many hats!!

    I’m in the middle of a Grocery Money-Saving Challenge over at my blog right now…it’s super fun! (And many of us are mostly or entirely grain-free!)

    Katie Reply:

    Kate,
    For real, if you have any good links that I could work with for Eat Well, Spend Less, send them on over via Twitter or email – I’d love to include your stuff! :) Katie

  • Danielle

    Eat Well, Spend Less – so very interested! I’m always looking for more ways to chop our food bills without compromising quality.
    Also cannot wait for your soaked grains ebook!
    I bought your snack book and the recipes in there have been used over and over! Thanks so much!

  • Charissa

    It is a good time for a break from the bread series, but I have to say, I’m excited for you to try Peter Reinhart’s recipes. I’ve been using his whole grains for a while, and the results have always been fantastic–with soaking included! And the kneading process doesn’t take too long. Only about 5 minutes of active hand kneading.

  • Heather

    Katie,
    I would love to listen to the podcast by Dr. O’Bryan, any chance of posting the link?
    By the way, I love your work – Thank You for all yo do for the real food lovers out there.

    Katie Reply:

    Heather, Thank you! I’m having a hard time finding the exact podcast for sure, but it might be either this one: http://undergroundwellness.com/uw-radio-gluten-sensitivity-references/ or this one: http://undergroundwellness.com/detecting-gluten-sensitivity/
    Dr. O’Bryan is SUCH a good speaker and really interesting to listen to.

    Donielle at Naturally Knocked Up also has an interview with him here: http://www.naturallyknockedup.com/silent-cause-of-infertility/ It’s on my ipod somewhere, waiting for me to listen to it! :) Katie

  • Beth

    Hi, Katie! I know you are not eating grains for now, but we have a really good pizza crust recipe that uses beer. Such a yummy, yeasty flavor. My questions is this: Is beer acidic enough to help neutralize the phytic acid in the wheat during the 8-10 hour soak that I give it on pizza day? I looked up the ph of beer and it is higher than vinegar and lemon juice, so I am not sure. If not, perhaps I could just add a little vinegar to the beer when I mix it.

    Thanks for any insight you can offer and for the wonderful blog. I enjoy taking this little part of the journey with you. :)

    Katie Reply:

    Beth,
    I don’t think adding vinegar to the beer would help, since the overall pH would probably still be too high. Hmmm. My guess? Better than nothing! We’re going to consume some phytates no matter what, so they might as well be in the most delicious pizza you know! ;) Katie

Welcome!  Meet Katie.

I embrace butter. I make homemade yogurt. I eat traditional real food – plants and animals that God created, not products of plants where food scientists work. Here at Kitchen Stewardship, I share how I strive to be a good steward of my family's nutrition, the environment, and our budget, all without spending every second in the kitchen. Learn more about the mission of KS here.

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