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Why We Still Use (a LOT of) Redmond Real Salt {Review}

why we use a lot of redmond real saltI just love Real Salt.

I love the rustic multicolored granules. I love the story on the bottles of how it was discovered. I love that it comes without contamination from modern pollution. I love the 60 trace minerals.

I love sprinkling it on my eggs with abandon not worrying about the perils of refined salt. (What’s the deal with the health benefits of unrefined salt?)

Now that I’ve even been down in the mine in Utah, I love the whole company and their commitment to quality and purity even more:

Redmond Real Salt mine in Utah

And I love that the 10-pound buckets, of which I now have many, are awesome to fill with a whole 9-tray batch of crispy apple chips. Just sayin’. It’s the little things.

When we were filming for our video-based kids cooking class, the Kids Cook Real Food eCourse, we were turning brand names away from the camera, but on my Real Salt, I was like, “I know them – I kind of want this one on camera, and I know they won’t mind!”

We’ve been Real-Salt-onites since at least 2010 and Remond-Clay-ites for almost as long. I love their products and even more, their philosophy of business: The customer is always right, the product should be natural, God’s gifts, best quality, and generosity is certainly their default.

BYOS (Bring Your Own Salt — to Restaurants)

“Did you bring your own salt?” the gal next to me at my last book club asked, surprised.

“Um, yeah,” I ducked my head sheepishly. I had been trying to surreptitiously get my Real Salt pocket shaker out of my purse to make the beet-tomato-and-goat-cheese salad come into its own with flavor, but I got busted.

Since I was outed anyway, I figured a little real food evangelization wouldn’t hurt. “It’s Real Salt, and it has over 60 minerals instead of just two. It’s from this ancient underground sea deep in Utah.”

Yes, I really do stuff like that. And I give out Real Salt minis as stocking stuffers and party favors. Real foodies can be a different sort of breed (a heritage one, hopefully, right!? Ha!).

New Flavored Grinders to Make Flavorful Meals Easier

Redmond Real Salt grinders: lemon pepper & garlic pepper

Redmond just keeps adding new ways to keep real food delicious. I’m so excited about these new flavored salt grinders, in Lemon Pepper and Garlic Pepper. They only use the highest quality organic ingredients and skip all those nasty fillers, sugar and additives you’ll find in other flavored salt grinders.

We’ve had some since summertime and they’ve become a staple on our table. Like literally…you know how you might always leave salt and pepper on the table? These little cousins fit right in and have taken root! Even our little kids adore putting them on steamed or roasted veggies, meats, and salads. Honestly, sometimes I wonder why I spend any time seasoning at the stove!

Also, it has to be said – if you’re a fan of efficiency (and what parent isn’t?), to get 3-4 flavors in one quick grind is delicious and quick!

How We Use Our Unrefined Sea Salt

It used to alarm me a little bit when I realized how quickly I could go through a 10-pound bucket of unrefined salt.

It took our family less than a year to get through the whole thing!

And it’s not like we’re superfluous with our shaker at the table – although I admit I’m not afraid to add a little more to my eggs or soup, because I know that I’m still not using as much white salt as your average American eating processed foods.

There are health benefits to unrefined salt. It may even boost your metabolism! And I feel good about using Real Salt, with all the trace minerals God intended salt to have.

So although it shocked me at first when I realized that I could already see the bottom of this seemingly massive bucket of salt, I’m not worried about it.

When you think about from-scratch cooking and start adding up the teaspoons, it’s easy to understand how fast it can go!

Unrefined Salt

Using Real Salt in a Whole Foods Kitchen

My son was reading the Real Salt shaker at the table one night when he was about 10, and he piped up with curiosity, “Why do other salts have anything other than just salt in them?”

I told him that most salts add stuff to make it flow well.

“That’s dumb,” he wisely said. “Why?”

“I guess salt sometimes clumps up a little bit,” I answered.

“Who cares? Not a big deal.”

Wise again.

White table salt is also usually adulterated with dextrose, a corn sweetener. Why that’s there I really don’t know.

We’re all about the Real Salt, with the full spectrum of minerals.

I love supporting this US company while supporting my family’s health, and my husband loves the grilling seasoning so he can just take one bottle outside to season meat. I have a feeling the new flavored salt grinders are going to be a new favorite of his!

What Foods Does Our Real Salt go Into?

When you’re measuring by the teaspoon or tablespoon (and not just a tabletop shaker), here’s where your Real Salt goes:

  • Making homemade chicken stock requires 1 teaspoon per quart. When I make a batch of broth, I always make three, so that’s about 4-6 gallons of broth, or 16-24 teaspoons (up to a half cup) of salt!
  • Our favorite whole wheat rolls use 2 teaspoons of salt for just one batch, and my honey whole wheat sourdough that used to be our daily bread, literally, calls for 2 teaspoons per batch as well.
  • I’ve fallen off the wagon, sadly, of making homemade crackers, but both the Wheat-Thin-style cracker and the sourdough cracker that I used to make regularly take another teaspoon per double batch (and a double batch is barely worth dirtying the bowl – I’m a quad batch homemade cracker maker when I take the time!).
  • Throw a half to a full teaspoon into each casserole, batch of rice, or pound of homemade spiced sausage that I make and you can see how it really adds up!

I’ve now graduated from the 10-pound bucket to the 25-pound bag, which I split with my mom who makes a lot of homemade bread. Note: Sadly there are no more 10-pound buckets of salt, just 10-pound bags, BUT as of Feb. 2024 you can still buy an empty bucket to refill.

Real Salt offers plenty of ways to buy salt in bulk, in case 25 pounds seems a little much.

  • Regular 26-oz. refill pouch (my mom loves the pour spout on these, easier to refill the shakers)
  • 10-pound bag (buy an empty bucket to make it easier to scoop to refill your shakers)
  • 25-pound bag (this is a plastic bag, but I’ll at least use it to line a bathroom garbage before throwing away)
If you are ready to get REAL with your salt, use the code “Kitchenstew” for 15% off anything.
Sea Salt Bucket

Other Ways to Use Real Salt

My husband and I are trying to take one salt bath per week (rather unsuccessfully, unfortunately, but it’s a good goal). We use Redmond bath salts and a good soak, and not only is it relaxing but I know I’m assimilating minerals through my skin that can bring better balance to my body.

I also use Real Salt for cleaning. It works so well to clean my cast iron pans!

Does Real Salt Have Too Much Lead? Is It Unsafe?

In 2024, there have been some posts questioning the amount of lead in Redmond Real Salt, and I’m receiving comments and questions about it! I’ve been in the Remond mines, and I know it’s as natural as it comes, but it’s always worth finding out more.

I don’t have time to do hours of research, so I’m relying on answers from Redmond:

“These sorts of attention-grabbing posts and blogs are always concerning, but the science and chemistry are a lot more complicated than any single post. Because we live on the planet Earth, and because the earth is made of elements, there will be trace amounts of earth-based elements in everything earth related. And fortunately, our bodies have the ability to deal with these elements in trace amounts as they are found in all food and water (as shown in the test).

It should also be noted that when looking at trace and ultra trace amounts on a single elemental assay, the amounts change due to testing sensitivity as well as natural variation. With our testing over the last 30 years, sometimes an element like lead will show up, other times it won’t. And the amounts detected can change.

Because of this, on our published analysis on these elements list the highest amount we have ever found, and then add a few more, with a “less than” symbol. That is just to make sure if anyone else ever does a test, their test will be less than ours. So, a single test like the one they referenced with 78% showing aluminum and 98% show lead, would likely be 100% if they would have done 30 tests over multiple years. And that is because it will always be there, because we live in earth.

The second part of this discussion is that all forms of all elements are not the same. This part makes the headline-catching buzz-words more laughable.

On an elemental analysis, they test for the presence of a pure element, not the compound(s) that those elements occur in. Even though they occur as different compound and/or isotopes. In salt, 100% pure table salt, the test results would show 620,000 parts per million (ppm) Chlorine and 380,000 ppm Sodium. This is where it gets interesting. Everyone knows that pure elemental Chlorine is a deadly, acid, gas. Super dangerous and super deadly. Lesser known, is that pure elemental Sodium is an extremely volatile silver-colored metal that is a very alkaline base. In fact, a single drop of water on a block of pure, metallic, silver and it will explode violently. Yet, if you attach a single sodium to a single chlorine, you get sodium chloride which is nothing like pure sodium and nothing like pure chloride. Similarly, there are some forms of iodine that are essential for life. Other forms of iodine, like Iodone131, are extremely radioactive and will kill you in a short period of time.

Aluminum is similar in that some forms of aluminum are extremely problematic, and others are completely inert. In fact, aluminum is the 3rd most abundant element in the earth crust, but fortunately it does not occur in a pure elemental form but rather attached to silica. And when aluminum shows up as an aluminum silicate, it is completely inert and 100% different from elemental aluminum – even though on an elemental analysis you will see aluminum and silica listed as different elements.

We actually have had a few different blog posts addressing these topics for years and I will share the links below. Like many things, these topics come and go as hot-buttons with different news/blog posts, so we just leave them up for times like this:

All that said, we know that Real Salt is not for everyone. And anyone that feels that highly processed salts like Morton or Diamond Crystal are preferred because of their highly processed and refined approach to salt is better, are probably better off using a different brand. In contrast, we feel that nature has it right when it comes to prodcuts. So even though natural products, including natural salts, have natural earth-based elements, we prefer them to a highly refined product that tried to “improve” on nature.

Hope that helps and thanks again for reaching out and for being a fan of Redmond.

I asked about the equipment used to mine and process the salt, just in case. Good answer:

The equipment used to grind the salt is a carbide tipped drum, which is a carbon based manufactured alloy with zero lead. Lead is extremely soft and is not used in any of the metals or processes.

Have you tried Real Salt? What is your favorite use for Real Salt?

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I’m well known for honest, thorough product reviews…

reviewed and recommended
 

…and you can always tell a real family has run these products through the gauntlet.

When I review a type of item, I try to review a LOT of different brands! From over a dozen reusable sandwich bags to over 120 natural mineral sunscreens, I’m your girl for straight-up info about natural, real foodie items you’re considering buying.

Click here to see more product reviews and you’ll also love my resources page, with REAL products that have passed my rigorous testing enough to be “regulars” in the Kimball household, plus some other comprehensive reviews. Updated at least once a year to boot the losers and add new gems!

Unless otherwise credited, photos are owned by the author or used with a license from Canva or Deposit Photos.

44 thoughts on “Why We Still Use (a LOT of) Redmond Real Salt {Review}”

  1. Have you had the salt tested for heavy metals.
    This seems to be a prevalent problem with salts.
    Check out Leadfree Mama for Redmond Salt results.

    1. Hi Judith,
      Just getting to this after a break for Christmas and New Year’s – it’s true that LeadFree Mama and Mamavation have both published testing results that don’t look good for Redmond. However, I also have been down in the Redmond mine, so I know it’s as natural as it comes. For our family, I have no concerns.

      Here is an explanation from Redmond: https://kb.redmond.life/is-there-lead-in-real-salt

      I’m still trying to dig into the issue more with questions about the machines used to harvest the salt, but overall, I know Redmond salt is from the earth, so I’m not going to freak out about it and run to Morton. 🙂 Katie

      1. Wynter Kruger

        I will be curious about any info you get regarding Redmond salt. I just read the article on salt from Mamavation, and it’s disturbing. The strange thing is that the salts that are recommended as best are just common labels–Hain, Morton, etc. They tested safe but probably don’t even have any trace minerals remaining…I know that Mamavation gets a lot of kickback from people buying what she recommends.

        1. Hi Wynter! Pardon my delay on this answer, but I wanted to make sure I had a complete answer for you. I don’t have time to do hours of research, so I have to rely on answers from Redmond themselves:

          “These sorts of attention-grabbing posts and blogs are always concerning, but the science and chemistry are a lot more complicated than any single post. Because we live on the planet Earth, and because the earth is made of elements, there will be trace amounts of earth-based elements in everything earth related. And fortunately, our bodies have the ability to deal with these elements in trace amounts as they are found in all food and water (as shown in the test). It should also be noted that when looking at trace and ultra trace amounts on a single elemental assay, the amounts change due to testing sensitivity as well as natural variation . With our testing over the last 30 years, sometimes an element like lead will show up, other times it won’t. And the amounts detected can change. Because of this, on our published analysis on these elements list the highest amount we have ever found, and then add a few more, with a “less than” symbol”. That is just to make sure if anyone else ever does a test, their test will be less than ours. So, a single test like the one they referenced with 78% showing aluminum and 98% show lead, would likely be 100% if they would have done 30 tests over multiple years. And that is because it will always be there, because we live in earth.

          The second part of this discussion is that all forms of all elements are not the same. This part makes the headline-catching buzz-words more laughable. On an elemental analysis they test for the presence of a pure element, not the compound(s) that those elements occur in. Even though they occur as different compound and/or isotopes. In salt, 100% pure table salt, the test results would show 620,000 parts per million (ppm) Chlorine and 380,000 ppm Sodium. This is where it gets interesting. Everyone knows that pure elemental Chlorine is a deadly, acid, gas. Super dangerous and super deadly. Lessor known, is that pure elemental Sodium is an extremely volatile silver-colored metal that is a very alkaline base. In fact, a single drop of water on a block of pure, metallic, silver and it will explode violently. Yet, if you attach a single sodium to a single chlorine, you get sodium chloride which is nothing like pure sodium and nothing like pure chloride. Similarly, there are some forms of iodine that are essential for life. Other forms of iodine, like Idone131, are extremely radioactive and will kill you in a short period of time. Aluminum is similar in that some forms of aluminum are extremely problematic, and others are completely inert. In fact, aluminum is the 3rd most abundant element in the earth crust, but fortunately it does not occur in a pure elemental form but rather attached to silica. And when aluminum shows up as an aluminum silicate, it is completely inert and 100% different from elemental aluminum – even though on an elemental analysis you will see aluminum and silica listed as different elements.

          We actually have had a few different blog posts addressing these topics for years and I will share the links below. Like many things, these topics come and go as hot-buttons with different news/blog posts, so we just leave them up for times like this:

          https://kb.redmond.life/is-there-aluminum-in-real-salt

          https://kb.redmond.life/is-there-lead-in-real-salt

          All that said, we know that Real Salt is not for everyone. And anyone that feels that highly processed salts like Morton or Diamond Crystal are preferred because of their highly processed and refined approach to salt is better, are probably better off using a different brand. In contrast, we feel that nature has it right when it comes to prodcuts. So even though natural products, including natural salts, have natural earth-based elements, we prefer them to a highly refined product that tried to “improve” on nature.

          Hope that helps and thanks again for reaching out and for being a fan of Redmond.”

          I asked about the equipment used to mine and process the salt, just in case. Good answer:
          “The equipment used to grind the salt is a carbide tipped drum, which is a carbon based manufactured alloy with 0 lead. Lead is extremely soft and is not used in any of the metals or processes.”

          I’ll be adding this to the post hopefully today – running around like crazy this week!
          🙂 Katie

    1. Hi Gee,
      Just getting to this after a break for Christmas and New Year’s – I did see the latest Mamavation report on lead in salt, and I’m always a bit dismayed. However, I also have been down in the Redmond mine, so I know it’s as natural as it comes. For our family, I have no concerns.

      Here is an explanation from Redmond: https://kb.redmond.life/is-there-lead-in-real-salt

      I’m still trying to dig into the issue more with questions about the machines used to harvest the salt, but overall, I know Redmond salt is from the earth, so I’m not going to freak out about it and run to Morton. 🙂 Katie

  2. I had been using a lot of this salt and enjoying it but I recently ran into problems getting it shipped to me. Redmond had it listed on Amazon with one-day shipping and I went 14 days with no delivery and no updates. I contacted Amazon and they said it was a supply chain issue with Redmond. I got in touch with Redmond and they said it’s Amazon’s problem. They didn’t even try to help. I am very disappointed at the uncaring attitude at Redmond, but I don’t really want to do business with a company that won’t stand behind it’s product. I finally canceled the order (but haven’t gotten a refund) and will be switching back to Himalayan salt.

    The very least Redmond could have done was shipped out my order from wherever they have it and settle the money issue with Amazon. Or, if Amazon had given me my money back, I would would have sent it directly to Redmond. As it is, I have no salt and no money.

    1. Carolyn @ Kitchen Stewardship

      That’s really unfortunate. I’m sorry that has been your experience with the company. 🙁

  3. What kind of salt shaker do you use with Redmond’s? My fiestaware salt shaker will not allow for sufficent salt shaking. Is their a favorite of yours? I would like to be able to use an attractive one to leave at my stove side. We have been using this salt for over 10 years! I was unaware of the 10 pound size though! Thanks!

    1. Whoops, sorry I missed your comment – once November started “holiday” stuff got crazy over here! I’m pretty boring and just use the salt shaker Real Salt comes in. I know some people have very attractive “pinch bowls” stove side — because salt is naturally antibacterial I guess it doesn’t matter if you stick your fingers in it?
      Glad to help introduce you to the big salt! 😉 Katie

  4. I would use the grinders on fish and roasted veggies. I am one of your current email subscribers.

  5. I thought I posted a comment earlier but don’t see it now. About 18 months ago Wardee introduced me to Real Salt and I’ve been using it ever since. I cannot tolerate regular sodium chloride, but I can – and do – use Real Salt with abandon. And I feel better now too. I use at least 6 pounds a year.

    I too wasn’t able to register for the drawing, perhaps because I already subscribe. Great giveaway though!

  6. Great offer here, Katie 🙂 I am a current subscriber. We use at least 15+ lbs of either Redmond’s RealSalt or Grey Himalayan Salt (and sometimes the pink) for a family of 5 and many regular extras. Several family members have adrenal dysfunction along with other chronic health issues, so it’s a regular staple at our house. Thanks again for this opportunity.

    1. Laura Snell @ Kitchen Stewardship

      Hey Aniko, I just tested the coupon code on my own computer and it did work. Maybe it was a temporary glitch and it’s all worked out now?

      1. Hi again Katie, sorry to be a pain. I tried it in two browsers and deleted cache and re-tried no REAL for me. So I guess I have some sort of a weirdness going on between my pc and the REAL people, not sure, but I get the message “Kitchenstew” does not exist. Don’t worry tho.

        1. Laura Snell @ Kitchen Stewardship

          How strange, Aniko! Please do contact Redmond so they can troubleshoot with you. Unfortunately, I can’t do anything about the coupon not working on their site, but I’m certain that the folks over at Redmond would want to help you get the discount you deserve. https://redmond.life/contact-redmond-life/

  7. RealSalt is the only salt in my home! When DH takes leftovers to work, I send him with a shaker of RealSalt.

  8. I love using real salt you can definitely taste a difference between the salt they process and unrefined pure salt.

    I am also a subscriber.

  9. We love using Real Salt as well! I think I learned about it from you a few years ago. Lately I have been concerned though that we need the iodine and are not getting enough. We eat a “real food diet” so get very little salt. Do you think that if you are eating, whole, natural foods, your body will get enough? Or, do you have a brand of salt with iodine that you use as well?
    Thanks!
    Jen

      1. Rachel Rutkoski

        Thanks for the great post! Very clear how much you genuinely love Real Salt. I am planning to try some soon!

        Do you have a particular brand and source for the kelp powder you mentioned in the comment above?

  10. I love Real Salt and Himalayan Pink Sea Salt, but I tend to buy the Him. Pink because of the pricing I can find. I keep searching for which is better, healthwise, but do you know if one is significantly better than the other and why? Thanks!

    1. I think they’re pretty close, Debbie – might have a handful of minerals different but both have dozens. Real Salt is US made which I appreciate a lot. Even Redmond/Real Salt admits that the health benefits are similar: https://realsalt.com/comparing-real-salt-to-himalayan-celtic/

      🙂 Katie

  11. I already subscribe to your newsletter and find a lot to be thankful for in it! Thanks for all you posts and help!

  12. We use sea salt, Himalayan salt, and real salt. We made the switch after a family member was diagnosed with a corn allergy. From what I have learned the dextrose is used to stabilize the iodine on the salt. All iodized salt has dextrose even iodized sea salt.

  13. I am like to use the pink Himalayan salt, the last time I bought some it was from Sam’s Club. We have started using more because my husband has started smoking our bacon and turkey.

  14. I too use Real Salt. It’s my favorite and I don’t worry if someone feels they need to add more salt to their food since I am not a heavy salter. I love that I can see the minerals when put salt into a pot of water for pasta. We keep it in a jar on the counter so when my 6 year old makes eggs he is able to get it easily. I love that it’s not terribly expensive either.

  15. You got me started using Real Salt a few years ago and we love it. We also love their seasoned salt – so yummy! Oh, and I already subscribe to your newsletter…not sure where I was supposed to tell you that, the raffle copter thing just said to tell you 🙂

  16. I enjoy using the Himalayan salt, it’s a pretty pink color. I use Kosher and sea salt too. I like hte grinders for my salt.

  17. We love Real Salt! I never worry about how much real salt I use; I use it liberally and feel great, but when I eat out somewhere that uses a lot of conventional salt I get totally bloated and need to drink 2 gallons of water afterward. It’s pretty crazy to see such a big difference!

  18. Michelle Bonsell

    i didn’t know where to post this for the drawing but I already subscribe to your newsletter I checked the box and entered it but you said let you know if I already subscribe and I do.

      1. And I entered my Twitter name wrong: I’m @mrsbpart. I don’t know what I entered but it wasn’t that! ?

  19. I recently just started grinding my own flour and making our bread (with some trial and error) and I use the Real Salt and I love it. I am trying to learn as much as I can to feed my families the best.
    I love your site and your encouragement. I look forward to what I can glean from you.
    🙂

  20. Since I make my own stock and bake often, and cook nearly every day, I would say I go through at least 10#, probably quite a bit more. I use only sea salt, mostly purchased in 3# bags at the grocery.

  21. I love using Real Salt too, and we go through it like crazy as well. When my kids were doing your cooking classes they thought it was so cool that you use the same salt we do! I tried ordering my salt in the paper bags to save on plastic, and they came wrapped in plastic so they wouldn’t leak. 🙁 Now I have found a small farm store that sells it and I usually get it there.

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