Italian Inspired Keto Tortillas Recipe {2g Net Carb}

Keto cooking – or keto-fying a favorite food – isn’t always the easiest or tastiest.

We’ve made almond flour chocolate chip cookies that were better than the originals, coconut flour muffins that are moist and delicious, and Paleo banana bread that’s to die for (grain-free but not keto)…AND we’ve also had some definite flops in our experimenting over the years.

Finding a good grain-free, keto tortillas recipe has taken a bit of trial and error, but I’ve finally found one that delivers consistent results and makes pizza night something to look forward to again!

Grain-free keto tortillas stacked on a plate made with the homemade keto tortillas recipe

The Skinny on this Almond Flour Tortillas Recipe

Regular tortillas become keto-friendly tortillas by swapping out the wheat flour and replacing it with something (or a combination of somethings) a little easier on the blood sugar. The primary swap in this recipe is almond flour in place of wheat flour.

Homemade tortillas of any kind are a bit time-consuming, and sometimes even the gadgets that are supposed to make life easier…just don’t. With this almond flour tortillas recipe, there are a few hurdles to get over:

  1. If you are just starting a grain-free or keto diet, you may not have these ingredients in your pantry yet, but you should have no problem sourcing them. That being said, if you’re used to making foods grain-free or keto-friendly, you may have what you need to get started right away.
  2. No grains = no gluten. And that means a slightly crumbly dough that is a bit more difficult to roll out and move. Parchment paper or silicone mats + a thin metal spatula make the process much easier.
  3. The final product is not quite as flexible and pliable as wheat tortillas (again, no gluten). These probably aren’t the tortillas you want to roll a big burrito, but I find them perfect for quesadillas, pizza crusts, or even a great sandwich maker!

For me, it’s absolutely worth it to make these grain-free keto tortillas when we’re trying to avoid grains 100% or watching our carb intake. I’m glad I know how to make them because it’s way more cost-effective than the store-bought ones, plus I have more control over ingredient quality.

If you have kiddos or others in your family who aren’t grain-free or keto, this whole wheat tortillas recipe gets rave reviews in our house.

 

GLUTEN-FREE CAN BE CONFUSING BUT IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE HARD!

I’m thrilled to share a FREE gluten-free cheat sheet mini eBook to help get you started!

This is perfect if you’ve just been told you need a GF diet, if you have a friend or family member eating GF and you’d like to cook for them, or if you’re just curious what it’s all about!

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon
Keto tortillas on a plate with pepperoni and cheese made with the grain free keto tortillas recipe

Grain-Free Keto Tortillas with an Italian Twist

  • Author: Katie Kimball
  • Prep Time: 20 mins
  • Cook Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 30 mins
  • Yield: 16 1x
  • Category: Breads, Rolls, Tortillas
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

Grain-free Keto tortillas you can make at home. Only 2g net carb per tortilla! The Italian twist makes them great to use as a pizza crust or for quesadillas.


Ingredients

Scale


ship kroger


Instructions

  1. Measure hot water in a glass measuring cup and mix the psyllium husks in; allow to sit while you work on the rest. They will get very thick, nearly a solid. That’s expected.
  2. In a separate bowl or food processor, mix all the dry ingredients, then cut or process in the olive oil (use the code STEWARDSHIP for 10% off at that site!) and tomato sauce.
  3. Cut or process in the psyllium husk mixture, watching to see glimmering throughout to get the psyllium husk fully incorporated, then add water as necessary to help incorporate all the dry parts and avoid your tortillas being crumbly. Knead with your hands for 1-2 minutes.
  4. Divide dough into 16 equal balls.
  5. Place one dough ball between two layers of flexible material – you might use parchment paper, wax paper, silicone mats, or a plastic, flexible cutting board. Lightly sprinkle arrowroot starch on the bottom surface, then put a bit on top of the ball of dough too. Not too much – but enough to prevent sticking.
  6. Flatten with the palm of your hand, roll from the center out, then rotate and repeat, rolling out to about 6” diameter.
  7. Use the flexibility of your surface along with gravity and perhaps your metal spatula to help you peel the circle of dough off and get it to your cooking surface.
  8. You may also be able to manage rolling out with nothing between your rolling pin and the dough, but you’ll need a very thin, sturdy metal spatula to scrape the tortilla-dough-circle off whatever surface you’re using. Keep them small; they’re a bit tricky to manage.
  9. In a cast iron pan, heavy-bottomed skillet, or best yet, a griddle of some sort, cook tortillas until very lightly browned on the bottom and dry-looking, then flip. On the stovetop, use medium-low to start. If they fall apart while flipping, you didn’t cook long enough. If they become brittle like a chip, you either cooked them too long or at too high of a temperature.
  10. I hesitate to give an exact time for cooking because it varies with the temperature of the surface. I’ve cooked them for 30 seconds per side or 2 minutes, depending on how high my burner was on under my cast iron griddle. On medium-low, it’s about 30 seconds. Just check for browning on the bottom edges.
  11. Store in an airtight container of some kind at room temperature for a day or in the refrigerator for 5-7 days. (Maybe longer…I’m not sure! They haven’t lasted that long here yet…)

Notes

If the dough is sticky, they won’t behave well. Use arrowroot starch liberally on your surface by spreading it out with your hands. (Coconut flour to roll makes the tortillas taste like coconuts because it’s right on the outside, so I wouldn’t recommend that.)

These do NOT work on an electric tortilla press. They fall apart into a very thin top and bottom, even when the non-stick surface was slathered with grease.

The tortillas are sturdier with coconut flour and roll a bit better, but if you don’t have coconut flour, they’ll still work fine without it.

Try other add-ins, like roasted red peppers, garlic, spinach, and zucchini.

Try adding some grated Parmesan cheese, both for flavor and stick-together-ness.

Serve with pizza sauce and cheese, fried on the same surface you cook your tortillas on.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 Tortilla
  • Calories: 75
  • Sugar: .5g
  • Sodium: 180mg
  • Fat: 5.5g
  • Saturated Fat: 1g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 0g
  • Trans Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 5g
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Protein: 1.5g
  • Cholesterol: 0mg

Keywords: keto, almond flour, grain-free, low carb, Italian

Need a little help getting healthy food on the table every day? Real Plans takes the stress out of meal planning and puts the nourishing food BACK on your table. There’s a plan for every diet type, including GAPS, Paleo, AIP, Whole30, vegetarian and more! You remain totally in control: use your own recipes, accept theirs, and teach the system what your family likes…Check out how powerful it is here!

Making the Grain-Free Keto Tortillas Recipe – a Process in Pictures

Seeing is believing. Here’s how to do it:

Place a ball of dough between two layers of flexible material – you might use parchment paper, wax paper, silicone mats, or a plastic, flexible cutting board. (Below I’m using a flexible plastic cutting board on the bottom and a silicone mat on the top.)

Lightly sprinkle arrowroot starch on the bottom surface, then put a bit on top of the ball of dough too. Not too much – but enough to prevent sticking. Begin with the palm of your hand, flattening the ball slightly.

making the keto tortillas recipe - dough ball and hand flattened dough

With a rolling pin, roll from the center out, then rotate and repeat, rolling out to about 6″ diameter.

Use the flexibility of your surface along with gravity and perhaps your metal spatula to help you lift the circle of dough onto your cooking surface.

In a cast-iron pan, heavy-bottomed skillet, or best yet, a griddle of some sort, cook tortillas until very lightly browned on the bottom and dry-looking, then flip. I use a cast-iron griddle, which I love, but it’s unfortunately no longer available. However, it looks like there are some great options on Amazon.

Making the keto tortillas recipe - keto tortillas rolled flat and on the cooking surface

On the stovetop, use medium-low to start. If they fall apart while flipping, you didn’t cook long enough. If they become brittle like a chip, you either cooked them too long or at too high of a temperature.

How to Serve Grain-Free Keto Tortillas

Eating them comes next, and that’s the fun part! There are all sorts of ways to incorporate these tortillas into your keto meals.

Don’t Skip Pizza Night

One of my favorite ways to use these keto-friendly tortillas is to use them as individual serving pizza crusts. Top with your choice of sauce and your favorite pizza toppings. Then transfer back to the same surface you used for cooking the tortilla to warm through and melt the cheese.

Keto tortillas on a plate with pepperoni and cheese made with the grain free keto tortillas recipe

Quesadillas with an Italian Spin

The Italian seasonings and touch of tomato sauce in the recipe make this tortilla an excellent choice for quesadillas without the carbs!

Again using the same surface you did for cooking the tortillas, top one tortilla with your choice of cheese and place another tortilla on top. Let the cheese start to melt, and the bottom tortilla begins to crisp and then carefully flip.

Once the other tortilla is browning and slightly crisp, you can remove the quesadilla from the cooking surface. Cut in half or quarters and enjoy. These are especially good dipped in a homemade tomato soup like my nourishing salsa soup (you can play around with the spices to make the flavors really compliment one another).

A Crunchy Topping for Salads or Soups

One thing that can be missing from a keto diet is a good satisfying crunch. Well-known snack foods and potato chips are out, and while there are some commercially available replacements, a glance at the ingredients list usually makes me cringe.

These tortillas can really save you here. A shallow fry in a cast-iron pan with a healthy, high smoke point oil, like avocado oil or coconut oil (if you don’t mind the coconutty-taste), will crisp these up and add a satisfying crunch to your salad or soup.

You’ll want to slice the tortillas into very thin strips and get your oil nice and hot. Use a large cast-iron pan and pour no more than 1/4 inch of oil into the bottom of the pan.

Add no more than a single layer of tortilla strips to the pan and cook to your desired crispness – it should only take a few minutes. If you have more tortilla strips than will fit in a single layer in the pan, you can cook them in batches.

Use a slotted spoon to lift the strips from the oil and let them drain on a cooling rack over a plate.

Bonus Option – Try an air fryer! I don’t own one yet, but I’ve heard all the rave reviews. If you try it, let me know how it turned out in the comments.

I especially enjoy these as a topping for this steak fajita soup recipe or this Italian Wedding meatball, zucchini, and greens soup.

You can find the recipe for the plain tortillas in The Healthy Lunch Box ebook!

The Healthy Lunch Box - packed with lunch ideas to go!
 

Packing healthy lunches when you’re short on time and out of bread is mind-boggling. Is there such a thing as a lunch without a sandwich? Is it possible for it to be healthy too?

The Healthy Lunch Box: Sandwich-free Secrets to Packing a Real Food Lunch is loaded with strategies to streamline your packing process, stock your pantry with emergency backups for your backups, and send healthy, delicious food in the lunch box, no matter how old your eater is. Read more and start packing healthier, processed-free lunches today.

Italian Inspired Keto Tortillas Recipe

Other Grain-free and Keto Resources:

What’s your favorite grain-free or keto swap?

11 thoughts on “Italian Inspired Keto Tortillas Recipe {2g Net Carb}”

    1. So…not to hijack Katie’s comments but…do you think there is any way I could use the psyllium powder in this recipe? I tried making the THM egg white wraps and just…gross. I know I saw you make them on instagram and mine looked nothing like yours. I don’t want to waste the bottle!

      1. Stacy Makes Cents

        Yes, you can use them…but the ratio is way different. You’ll have to play around with it a bit to get the texture right. You need WAY less of the powder than the husks. Maria Emmerich uses a lot of psyllium husk powder so you might check out her blog. 🙂

      1. Stacy Makes Cents

        It’s a good thickener – and it gives body to recipes that are GF. It can take the place of xanthan.

  1. I see lard mentioned in the instructions, but not the ingredients list. Does the EVOO replace the lard from a previous version of this recipe?

    I also did not see where the tomato sauce is added. I’m guessing before the water.

    1. Teresa,
      Whoops! Good catch!! I mistakenly copied my directions for the plain grain-free tortillas from the lunch box book, forgetting the changes in the type of fat! Sorry about that – I updated it now. The lard is only in the plain torts. Thanks for your help! 🙂 Katie

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Recipe rating

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Scroll to Top
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]
[activeKey]